Q & A with Natalie Lomako from www.natalieisahistorybuff.com


Hi Natalie, welcome to our website

Tell us about yourself and what sparked your interest in history? My interest in history was originally sparked by the area in which I grew up - it’s a UNESCO Heritage site in Old Riga, plus my mother has always encouraged my curiosity in the humanities and the arts. I remember one day she gave me a print-out of the Romanovs’ dynasty tree, and my interest in Royal History was thus solidified. Later in my life my main focus switched to Tudors, then to Plantagenets, and the rest, as they say, is history... What inspired you to set up your own blog? I wanted to have an outlet for my musings. What can readers expect to find there? The readers are invited to share my journeys to the historically important sites, as well as dive into my musings on the books I’ve read and the period dramas I have watched. My main interest lies in British Royal History, however, Russian and French royal dynasties will pop up. I’m also greatly enthralled by the history of London, the history of the English language, and Shakespeare's body of work. The last three go very well together.

What particular period of history do you feel most drawn to and why? It always depends on the period I’m researching at that moment. But if I had to pick, I’d say the Plantagenets. Just so much drama ‘twould shame any fiction. What are some of your favourite historic sites to visit? My most favourite one is The Tower of London, simply because it’s the ‘it’ building for British History. Another one of my favourites is Kenilworth Castle. It’s just so beautiful and haunting, especially in autumn. Also it’s a setting for one of the best royal love stories - that of Elizabeth I and Earl of Leicester.

Who is your favourite past Monarch and why?

Henry VIII, King of England (reigned. 1509-1547) hands down. In my humble view, he was the one who 'put England on the map'.

Who is your favourite living royal/s and why?


Probably the Cambridges. They are the embodiment of a modern royal family. The regal past weaved into the sensible present. 

What are you currently reading?


‘Eleanor of Castile: The Shadow Queen’ by Sara Cockerill. I’m fascinated by this medieval queen who’s been under the popular history radar for so long.

Name three books you would recommend?

‘Children of England’ by Alison Weir, ‘1536: The Year that Changed Henry VIII’ by Suzannah Lipscomb, and ‘The Plantagenets’ by Dan Jones.



What is your favourite historical TV show and/or movie? There are so many. The last one that really impressed me of late was ‘Outlaw/ King’ (2018) & 'The Favourite' (2018). During lock-down I have binge-watched 'Horrible Histories' (seasons 1-5), 'Ghosts' and 'Upstart Crow'...about two times each...Such great programmes.

If you could meet one historical figure from the past, who would it be and why?


William Shakespeare

The English playwright William Shakespeare. I’d love to have a chat with him and express my admiration.


What are your favourite plays? Hamlet & Much Ado About Nothing


The first page of the First Folio printing of Hamlet, 1623

You have a time machine, which event or period in history would you most like to see?

Hampton Court

The early Jacobean times, when Shakespeare’s work was premiered at locations such as Hampton Court and Banqueting House - both can be visited today, which makes it ever more thrilling. In those days you could meet 'Shakey', his actors and contemporaries, also James I of England, his son and heir Prince Henry, and the Duke of York - the future Charles I. Highly historically saturated scenario, methinks.


Procession of Characters from Shakespeare's Plays by an unknown 19th-century artist

You could invite four royals past and/or present [to dinner?] who would you invite?


With plus ones? (no, seating is limited, Covid restrictions!) OK then, Eleanor of Castile, Edward IV Katharine of Aragon & Charles II...


Also you could add one of your blogs to it to give readers an idea of your work? Here are some fun facts I’ve added to the post about Whitehall Palace: “...Fun Facts:

Holbein Gate (where Anne Boleyn & Henry got married and possibly not for the first time) was a bridge between the two complexes of the palace. It was situated approximately where the road crossing next to Banqueting House is now.


For some reason I love the fact that Henry VIII and Charles I - the two kings who added some of the most twisted turns of our national history - both died at Whitehall, though differently, of course. They also share a tomb - they both lie in a vault under the St. George Chapel at Windsor Castle. Other 'residents' of the vault include Henry's third wife Jane Seymour and Queen Anne.


It’s in this hall that some of Shakespeare’s plays were performed for the first time - most notably The Tempest in 1611.


The Banqueting House is only five hundred and thirty yards away from the location that literally defines where Central London is, i.e. the statue of Charles I at Trafalgar Square. I'm sorry, what was that, Oliver?”


The Old Palace of Whitehall by Hendrick Danckerts, c. 1675

Image: The view is from the west, in St. James's Park. The Horse Guards barracks are on the extreme left, with the taller Banqueting House behind it. The four-towered building left of centre is the palace gatehouse, the "Holbein Gate"


To read the full blog visit: https://www.natalieisahistorybuff.com

© Natalie Lomako

Thank you again for this opportunity, Kindest regards,

Natalie

Natalie Lomako History Buff

E: nat@natalieisahistorybuff.com W: www.natalieisahistorybuff.com


Thank you for reading


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